Corpus Christi

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While Upstate was unable to screen Corpus Christi at our theaters before we shut things down, we still think it’s worth watching. In partnership with Film Movement, we’re pleased to offer you a chance to watch it in the comfort and safety of your own home. When you buy a ticket for a Virtual Screening of Corpus Christi, half of the ticket price comes right back to support Upstate Films. In these difficult times, it’s a great way to keep up with the best independent and international films, and to help the theater workers, distributors and filmmakers who are all struggling with this abrupt change of circumstances.


PURCHASE TICKET

Corpus Christi is available from Film Movement, through the Film Movement Plus platform. Tickets are $12 per household, and you’ll have 72 hours to watch the movie after you purchase your ticket. When you make the purchase, you will receive an email from Film Movement with instructions on how to watch. You can watch on your browser, or stream with the Film Movement Plus App, which is available on most every common digital device (Apple, Roku, Amazon, Android…).

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Cold War

Academy Award Nominee – Best Cinematography, Best Director, Best Foreign Language Film
Like IDA, the director’s previous picture that won the Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film (2014), COLD WAR’s passionate love story about star-crossed lovers is set in the ruins of post-war Poland and Europe.
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Loving Vincent

LOVING VINCENT, the world’s first fully oil painted feature film, brings the artwork of Vincent van Gogh to life in an exploration of the complicated life and controversial death of one of history’s most celebrated artists.
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The 2015 Animated Oscar Nominated Short Films

In Woodstock 
Feb 14 15 16
See below for times
Watch the Oscar-nominated shorts before the Academy Awards on February 22nd! Upstate will screen the Live Action and the Documentary shorts this Saturday through Monday (Feb 14-15-16). The distributor of the Oscar shorts sent us basic ratings guidelines which we’ve included per category.
LIVE ACTION SHORTS PROGRAM: (118 mins)
(PG-13?) no violence or tragedy, some cursing, one of the strongest live action programs in a long time!
Rhinebeck: Wed (Feb 11) 8:10/Sat (Feb14) 8:15
Woodstock: Sat (Feb 14) 1:00
 

LIVE ACTION SHORTS

  • PARVANEH (Switzerland / Directed by Talkhon Hamzavi and Stefan Eichenberger)
  • BOOGALOO AND GRAHAM (UK / Directed by Michael Lennox and Ronan Blaney) 
  • AYA (Israel and France / Directed by Oded Binnun and Mihal Brezis) 
  • THE PHONE CALL (UK / Directed by Mat Kirkby and James Lucas) 
  • BUTTER LAMP (France and China / Directed by Hu Wei and Julien Féret)
DOCUMENTARY PROGRAM A: (81 mins):
(R?) A tough collection this year with films about cancer, slaughterhouse workers, and an infant with a rare respoiratory disorder. There are some tough to watch scenes in some that may be difficult for some. 
Rhinebeck Sun (Feb 15) 3:30/
Woodstock: Sun(Feb15) 1:30

documentary SHORTS

  • JOANNA (Poland / Directed by Aneta Kopacz)
  • CRISIS HOTLINE: VETERANS PRESS 1 (USA / Directed by Ellen Goosenberg Kent and Dana Perry)
DOCUMENTARY PROGRAM B: (79 mins):
(R?) There are some tough to watch scenes in THE REAPER and OUR CURSE that may be difficult for some.

Rhinebeck Mon (Feb 16) 3:30/
Woodstock Mon (Feb 16)4:30

  • OUR CURSE (Poland / Directed by Tomasz Sliwinski and Maciej Slesicki)
  • WHITE EARTH (USA / Directed by J. Christian Jensen)
  • THE REAPER (Mexico / Directed by Gabriel Serra Arguello)
View Oscar Shorts Website 

The 2015 Oscar Nominated Short Films

Coming Feb 13 – 19
Check showtimes 
Watch the Oscar-nominated shorts before the Academy Awards on February 22nd! Upstate will screen two of the shorts programs beginning Sat Feb 14. The distibutor of the Oscar shorts sent us basic ratings guidelines which we’ve included per category.
ANIMATED SHORTS PROGRAM: (82 mins)
(has shown already – twice in Rhinebeck/ once in Woodstock.
LIVE ACTION SHORTS PROGRAM: (118 mins)
(PG-13?) no violence or tragedy, some cursing, one of the strongest live action programs in a long time says Neal Block of Magnolia Films!
Rhinebeck: Sat (Feb14) 8:15
Woodstock: Sat (Feb 14) 1:00
 

LIVE ACTION SHORTS

  • PARVANEH (Switzerland / Directed by Talkhon Hamzavi and Stefan Eichenberger)
  • BOOGALOO AND GRAHAM (UK / Directed by Michael Lennox and Ronan Blaney) 
  • AYA (Israel and France / Directed by Oded Binnun and Mihal Brezis) 
  • THE PHONE CALL (UK / Directed by Mat Kirkby and James Lucas) 
  • BUTTER LAMP (France and China / Directed by Hu Wei and Julien Féret)
DOCUMENTARY PROGRAM A: (81 mins):
(R?) A tough collection this year with films about cancer, slaughterhouse workers, and an infant with a rare respoiratory disorder. There are some tough to watch scenes in some that may be difficult for some.
Rhinebeck Sun (Feb 15) 3:30/ Woodstock: Sun(Feb15) 1:30

documentary SHORTS

  • JOANNA (Poland / Directed by Aneta Kopacz)
  • CRISIS HOTLINE: VETERANS PRESS 1 (USA / Directed by Ellen Goosenberg Kent and Dana Perry)
DOCUMENTARY PROGRAM B: (79 mins):
(R?) There are some tough to watch scenes in THE REAPER and OUR CURSE that may be difficult for some.
Rhinebeck Mon (Feb 16) 3:30/Woodstock Mon (Feb 16)4:30

  • OUR CURSE (Poland / Directed by Tomasz Sliwinski and Maciej Slesicki)
  • WHITE EARTH (USA / Directed by J. Christian Jensen)
  • THE REAPER (Mexico / Directed by Gabriel Serra Arguello)
View Oscar Shorts Website 

Martin Scorsese Presents Masterpieces of Polish Cinema: Innocent Sorcerers

In Rhinebeck 
August 27
Wed 8:30
(Poland / 1960 / Dir by Andrzej Wajda)
Release date: December 17, 1960
Unrated / 88 mins.
While a student in the Łódź school, Jerzy Skolimowski (the author of Knife in the Water), cowrote Innocent Sorcerers with Andrzej Wajda. A love story and a portrait of young Poles in the 1950s the film tells the tale of two people meeting in a bar.
They don’t care about the future; their lives seem to consist of going out, playing jazz and having love affairs with no strings attached. The night begins for them with a seemingly simple scenario — from small talk to bed. But as dawn approaches, what starts as an insignificant episode grows in meaning. 1961 Edinburgh IFF – diploma.
More on the Scorsese Polish Films Series 

Martin Scorsese presents Masterpieces of Polish Cinema

scorsese
Series ongoing in both Rhinebeck and Woodstock
(Poland/1950s into the 1980s)
“In 2011, I had the opportunity to visit the Polish National Film School in Łódź, Poland, at the invitation of the great director, Andrzej Wajda. It was a trip I had wanted to make for years as I had long been drawn to the school and to Polish cinema from the time I was a film student at NYU, studying under my teacher and mentor, Haig Manoogian. It was at NYU—a school modeled after the legendary film program at Łódź – that I learned not just how films are made, but why.The school nurtured in me an unshakable belief in artistic expression grounded in Italian Neorealism, the French New Wave, the surreptitious poetry of the old Hollywood masters, and Polish cinema: the great, sweeping, humanistic, intimate and profound movies that were an integral part of what, looking back, seems more and more like a golden age of international cinema.”

 There are many revelations in the “Masterpieces of Polish Cinema” series and whether you’re familiar with some of these films or not, it’s an incredible opportunity to discover for yourself the great power of Polish cinema, on the big screen in brilliantly restored digital masters. — Martin Scorsese

“… This is a cinema of personal vision, social commitment and poetic responsibility from which we’ve all learned and which sets a high standard that, as a filmmaker, I strive to achieve with every film, every time out. Each of the films in this special series embodies what Wajda called “the ‘impertinent freedom of creativity in the cinema” These are films that have great emotional and visual power—they’re “serious” films that, with their depth, stand up to repeated viewings. The subtext of great conflict and cultural identity is universal, even if you don’t know the history of Poland, the themes in these films will resonate, as they did profoundly for me. There are many revelations in the “Masterpieces of Polish Cinema” series and whether you’re familiar with some of these films or not, it’s an incredible opportunity to discover for yourself the great power of Polish cinema, on the big screen in brilliantly restored digital masters. I hope you will enjoy these great films as much I do.Thanks to The Film Foundation and Milestone Films in the United States, and Propaganda Foundation, DI Factory and KinoRP in Poland for making this magnificent series possible.”
View Trailerclick for films and times

Camouflage – from Masterpieces of Polish Cinema

In Rhinebeck 
October 1
Wednesday 3:00
(Poland / 1976 /Written and Directed by Krzysztof Zanussi)
Unrated / 101 mins.
An ironical and absurd comedy, Camouflage transports us to a university summer school camp where the shallowness and cynicism of the academic milieu becomes apparent through the relationship between a young linguistics professor, Jaroslaw, and his diabolical senior colleague, Jakub.
“All people are conformists just like you and I,” exclaims the latter, protesting against the liberal teaching approach of Jaroslaw. Renowned contemporary Polish director Krzysztof Zanussi presents the deeply troubling premise of academic conformity with witty humor mocking the status quo. Not intended as a political film, Camouflage was harshly received by the Polish government, immediately landing on the year’s list of banned films. 1981 New York Film Critics Circle Awards – Special Award – winner. 1977 Polish Film Festival – Best Screenplay – winner, Best Actor (Zbigniew Zapasiewicz) – winner, Grand Prix Golden Lions – winner. 1978 Rotterdam IFF – Critics Award – winner. 1977 Tehran IFF – Best Directing – winner. 1981 New York Film Critics Circle Awards – Special Award – winner.
Link to the Polish Film Series 

Pharaoh

In Woodstock 
Oct 4
Sat 2:30
(Poland / 1965 / Directed by Jerzy Kawalerowicz)
Unrated / 153 mins.
An epic production, including battle scenes featuring thousands and refined choreography, Pharaoh focuses on the young Egyptian ruler, Ramses XIII who, with his young passions, love and idealism, has to face the cold pragmatism of dealing with the country’s external enemies and internal struggles.
His position reduced to but a figurehead, Ramses fights to regain power, ultimately falling to absolute control of knowledge by his priests. Riddled with psychological, moral, and philosophical questions on the nature of power, Pharaoh forgoes large battle scenes and romantic kisses in favor of a deeply meaningful artistic creation. Unfortunately, the German releasing firm that acquired the distribution rights to Pharaoh shortened the film for international release and then went bankrupt when there was little interest in the truncated version. Now restored to its original form, Pharaoh brandishes its heroism as a weapon — teaching all that noble defeat is better than silence in the face of morally corrupt politics. 1967 Academy Awards®, USA – Oscar® – nomination. 1966 Cannes Film Festival – Palme d’Or – nomination.
View TrailerRead more about the series

The Saragossa Manuscript

In Rhinebeck 
Oct 8
Wed 2:15
(Poland / 1965 / Directed by Wojciech J. Has)
Unrated / 184 mins (Part 1: 81 mins, Part 2: 103 mins.)
A favorite film of Jerry Garcia and Luis Buñuel, The Saragossa Manuscript is a brilliant adaptation of one of the greatest works of world literature.
It is a Chinese box tale — a travel story about the supernatural and mystical opposed to the humanist materialism. It is 1739 as Alphonse van Worden crosses the wild range of the Sierra Morena, a land said to be inhabited only by demons — evil spirits and invisible hands that push travellers into chasms. Although he refuses to listen to those tales, his journey will be a sequence of supernatural and frightful events. But maybe they’re only illusions. 1971 Cinema Writers Circle Awards, Spain – Special Award – winner. 1965 IFF Edinburg – special mention. 1965 IFF San Sebastian – CIDALC prize, Award of the International Journalist’s Club.
Read more about the series 

Blind Chance – from Masterpieces of Polish Cinema Series

 

imgres
Woodstock -Sept 13
Saturday 2:30
(Poland/1981/Krzysztof Kieślowski)
ur / 123 mins
One moment, one train — three completely different outcomes. From Director Krzysztof Kieślowski comes a film examining the effect of even the smallest of choices.
Twenty-year-old Witek Dlugosz rushes to make a train to Warsaw, his hometown, after the death of his father. Crashing into a man drinking beer, Witek is barely able to pull himself aboard by the final car’s handrail. On the train, he encounters an old communist, who convinces him to join the Communist Party. All seems fine until his beautiful lover Czuszka is arrested by the same party with which his allegiance lies. Their love falters, she rejects him, and Witek is left alone. Back in the station, Witek crashes hard into the man drinking beer, delaying him enough to miss his train. On the railway, he smacks into a guard and is arrested. Angry, he joins the anti-Communist resistance, thus launching another sequence of events that leaves him alone and distrusted. Finally, in the station again, Witek misses the train because he gets slowed down by the man with the beer, but stops to catch his breath, avoiding the guard from the second scenario. He sees Olga at the platform, the two return to her apartment, make a child, and get married. Witek finds the motivation to finish medical school, and with newfound responsibilities, he refuses to associate with any political party, avoiding the Communists completely and forging a happy life for himself. Blind Chance was heavily censored by the communist regime, due to its anti-Communist messages. The now restored version of the film comprises scenes never before been shown to the public. 1987 Polish Film Festival – Best Actor (Bogusław Linda) – winner, Silver Lion – winner.
 Read Review 

Martin Scorsese Presents Masterpieces of Polish Cinema: ASHES AND DIAMONDS

In Woodstock 
Aug 17
Sun 3:00
(Poland / 1958 / Directed by Andrzej Wajda)
Unrated / 104 mins. 
Ashes and Diamonds is set on the last day of World War II and the first day of peace. And between them, a night that changes everything.
Seen through the eyes of Maciek, a young Polish resistance soldier, the old is rapidly mixing with the new. In a few hours dawn will end the Nazi slavery of the country, but also will bring a new communist regime to Poland. This is not the independence the idealistic young man and his brothers in arms have been fighting and dying for. Should Maciek continue his combat when he wants so badly to live a normal, peaceful life? An iconic portrait of the dilemma of a whole generation in Poland, rooted in the literary tradition of great, tragic dramas of romanticism. 1960 BAFTA Awards – BAFTA Film Award – nomination. 1956 Venice Film Festival – FIPRESCI Prize – winner.

“When I first saw ASHES AND DIAMONDS one of the many highlights in this series and arguably one of the greatest films ever made – Polish or otherwise, I was overwhelmed by the film: the masterful direction, the powerful story, the striking visual imagery, and the shocking performance by Zbigniew Cybulski, considered the “Polish James Dean” with his electrifying presence. I was so struck by the film, it affected me so deeply, that I paid small homage by giving Charlie a pair of similar sunglasses in MEAN STREETS.” – Martin Scorsese

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Man of Iron

In Rhinebeck 
Sept 10
Wed 3:00
(Poland / 1981 / Directed by Andrzej Wajda)
Unrated / 154 mins.
A masterful story about the limitations of the press coupled with real footage of the Solidarity movement strikes. Winner of the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival and nominated for an Academy Award®, Man of Iron expands on the plot of its predecessor, Man of Marble.
It examines the events leading to one of the most crucial historical events of the 20th century. The movie was produced in haste at the express wish of the shipyard workers (with the use of their own archives) to support their strike. It features, among others, future Nobel Prize Winner and Polish President Lech Wałęsa as himself, and captures the passion, tragedy and anxiety of the times. 1981 Cannes Film Festival – Palme d’Or – winner, Prize of the Ecumenical Jury – winner. 1981 Chicago IFF – Gold Hugo – winner. 1982 Academy Awards®, USA – Oscar® – nomination. 1982 César Awards, France – César – nomination. 1982 Cinema Writers Circle Awards, Spain – CEC Award – winner. 1982 London Critics Circle Film Awards – ALFS Award – winner. 1982 New York Film Critics Circle Awards – Special Award – winner, NYFCC 2nd Award.
More on the Scorsese Polish Film Series 

A Short Film About Killing

Sept 7
Sunday 8:30
(Poland / 1987 / Directed by Krzysztof Kieślowski)
Unrated / 86 mins.
On a somber March day, the paths of three men cross: the cabbie Marian cleans his car, the lawyer Piotr celebrates passing his bar exam while in the same café, 20-year-old Jacek prepares his murder weapon.
The film is a psychological and ethical study of murder. A sensation at the Cannes film festival and recipient of numerous awards, A Short Film About Killing opened the door to an international career for director, Krzysztof Kieślowski. 1990 Bodil Awards – winner. 1988 Cannes Film Festival – FIPRESCI Prize, Jury Prize winner, Palme d’Or – nomination. 1988 European Film Awards – European Film Award – winner. 1990 French Syndicate of Cinema Critics – Critics Award – winner. 1988 Polish Film Festival – Golden Lions – winner. 1990 Robert Festival – winner.
More on the Scorsese Polish Film Series 

Night Train

In Rhinebeck 
Aug 31
Sunday 8:30
(Poland / 1959 / Directed by Jerzy Kawalerowicz)
Unrated / 99 mins.
An intimate psychological study and a poetic tale of loneliness, Night Train brings two voyagers together accidentally in a train compartment.
The subtle game of emotions — changing from mutual aversion to closeness without hope — is played out against the background of a microcosm of the human experience. A coquette, bored with her husband, attempts to seduce every available man; a former prisoner of a concentration camp fights his insomnia; old women go on a pilgrimage; and a skirt-chaser seeks his prey. With the arrival of police searching for a murderer, everything changes. It soon turns out that this seemingly average community is able to behave in a most unforeseen manner. An artistic work of great subtlety, Night Train offers itself open to various interpretations.
More on the Scorsese Polish Film Series 

Innocent Sorcerers

In Woodstock 
August 30
Sat 3:00
(Poland / 1960 / Dir by Andrzej Wajda)
Release date: December 17, 1960
Unrated / 88 mins.
While a student in the Łódź school, Jerzy Skolimowski (the author of Knife in the Water), cowrote Innocent Sorcerers with Andrzej Wajda. A love story and a portrait of young Poles in the 1950s the film tells the tale of two people meeting in a bar.
They don’t care about the future; their lives seem to consist of going out, playing jazz and having love affairs with no strings attached. The night begins for them with a seemingly simple scenario — from small talk to bed. But as dawn approaches, what starts as an insignificant episode grows in meaning. 1961 Edinburgh IFF – diploma.
More on the Scorsese Polish Films Series 

Martin Scorsese Presents Masterpieces of Polish Cinema: EROICA

Eroica 1
In Woodstock
August 24
Sun 8:00
(Poland/1957/Andrjez Munk)
ur / 85 mins
Andrzej Munk’s EROICA, a Heroic Symphony in two parts, a masterpiece of the Polish Film School, puts a realist lens to the romantic idea of heroism.
Based on a script by Jerzy Stefan Stawiński, Eroica draws on its author’s first-hand experience as a soldier in the September campaign against the invading German army in 1939. Imprisoned in a POW camp, Stawiński escaped, participated in the Warsaw Uprising, and upon its failure was returned to another POW camp. Eroica displays the futility of the armed struggle against both Germany and Russia, while exposing the idea of heroic suffering as preposterous. In the film, World War II-era Poland is under Nazi occupation. Two stories offer ambiguous images of war: the absurd life of an average bon-vivant who, against his better judgment, participates in the combat; and righteous Polish officers incarcerated in a German camp. Is there any place for glory in the perilous time of war?
1958 Mar del Plata Film Festival – FIPRESCI Prize – winner.
View TrailerRead more on Polish Masterpieces

Mother Joan of the Angels – from Masterpieces of Polish Cinema

mother-joan-of-the-angels-3_feature
In Woodstock 
September 27
Saturday 3:00 
(Poland/1960/dir by Jerzy Kawalerowicz)
ur/ 111 mins
Young, virtuous exorcist Father Suryn is assigned a difficult task: he must investigate a case of demonic possession after a local priest is burnt for tempting the nuns of a convent.
Arriving at the nunnery, he meets its abbess, Mother Joan, thus embarking a struggle against the forces of darkness to save her soul. Inevitably the priest must choose between sacrificing his own purity and saving the convent from evil. A visually sophisticated film, Mother Joan of the Angels is a study of faith, sin and redemption. 1961 Cannes Film Festival – Jury Special Prize – winner, Palme d’Or – nominated.
 Read Reviews

Ida

ida_bigeyes
Now showing
in Woodstock 
Starts in Rhinebeck
June 9 – 12Fri June 13
Mon 7:30
Tues 7:30
Wed 7:30
Thur 7:30 (last show)
(Poland/2013/dir by Pavel Pawlikowski)
PG-13 / 80 mins
A young novitiate nun in 1960s Poland is on the verge of taking her vows when she discovers a dark family secret dating from the terrible years of the Nazi occupation.
18-year old Anna (Agata Trzebuchowska), a sheltered orphan raised in a convent, is preparing to become a nun when the Mother Superior insists she first visit her sole living relative. The naïve innocent soon finds herself face to face with her aunt Wanda (Agata Kulesza), a worldly and cynical Communist Party insider, who shocks her with the declaration that her real name is Ida, that she’s Jewish, and her parents were murdered during the Nazi occupation. This revelation triggers a heart-wrenching journey into the countryside, to the family house and into the secrets of the repressed past, evoking the haunting legacy of the Holocaust and the realities of postwar Communism. In this beautifully directed film, Pavel (Last Resort, My Summer of Love) Pawlikowski returns to his native Poland to confront some of the more contentious issues in the history of his birthplace. The weight of history is everywhere, but its heft is shouldered by a young woman learning about the secrets of her own past.

 Critics’ Pick! “One of the finest European films in recent memory.” – A.O. Scott, The New York Times

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In Darkness


Mar 12 – 15

Mon 7:30
Tue 7:30
Wed 7:30
Thu 7:30 (last show)

(Poland / 2011 / dir by Agnieszka Holland)
R / 145 mins
From acclaimed director Agnieszka Holland (Europa Europa) comes this true story of a city worker and petty thief in Nazi occupied Poland who hides a group of Jews in the labyrinth of sewers underneath his town. 
Starting out as a straightforward and cynical business arrangement, an unexpected alliance forms between Leopold Socha (Robert Wieckiewicz) and those he is hiding as his enterprise seeps deeper into his conscience. But as he tries to stay one step ahead of growing suspicions that he is hiding a secret, Socha’s fragile tightrope begins to fray and his charges start to crack under the strain of life underground. An extraordinary story of survival, In Darkness is a testimony to human courage as it portrays men, women, and children all trying to outwit certain death during 14 months of ever increasing and intense danger. In Polish with subtitles.
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The Mill and the Cross

Oct 31 – Nov 3
Mon 6:10 8:25
Tue 6:10 8:25
Wed 6:10 8:25
Thur 6:10 8:25

(Poland / 2011 / dir by Lech Majewski)
Unrated / 96 mins
Lech Majewski, a Polish visual artist, has had a retrospective at MoMA and has been shown at the Venice Biennale; now he has created an exciting motion picture based on the painting by Pieter Bruegel, The Way to Calvary.
What would it be like to step inside a great work of art, have it come alive around you, and even observe the artist as he sketches the very reality you are experiencing? Lech Majewski brings to life Pieter Bruegel’s masterpiece The Way to Calvary, the story of the crucifixion, setting it in 16th century Flanders under brutal Spanish occupation. Rutger Hauer plays the artist, Michael York his patron, and Charlotte Rampling the Virgin Mary. As epic events unfold, bawdy country living continues unabated: couples entwine, musicians play wind instruments, soldiers torment their enemies mercilessly, and children scurry about. Using sophisticated computer technology, the filmmaker creates a brilliantly complex and fascinating multi-layered dreamscape that melds iconic moments in art, history, and religion with the quotidian lives of ordinary people.
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Katyn


Check for dates & showtimes

(Poland / 2007 / dir by Andrzej Wajda)

In this classically made film, director Andrzej Wajda explores a series of lies and distortions told over decades to disguise Poland’s loss of sovereignty.

In the spring of 1940, over the course of three days, some 15,000 Polish officers and intellectuals were killed at Stalin’s command and buried in Poland’s Katyn Forest. Yet until Gorbachev’s acknowledgment of Soviet involvement in 1990, the Soviets officially blamed Nazis for the slaughter. With elegant concision, Wajda depicts the events leading up to the massacre and its aftermath through the stories of three fictional women searching for truth about their lost husbands and brothers. Focusing on their grief and confusion, and on the ferocity with which they hold onto the dignity that history conspires to strip from them, the result is a film with a stately, deliberate quality that insulates it against sentimentality and makes it all the more devastating. Nominated for an Academy Award for Best Foreign Film, KATYN stands as a powerful corrective to decades of distortion and forgetting.

R / 121 mins

View Trailer

Read Reviews