Corpus Christi

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While Upstate was unable to screen Corpus Christi at our theaters before we shut things down, we still think it’s worth watching. In partnership with Film Movement, we’re pleased to offer you a chance to watch it in the comfort and safety of your own home. When you buy a ticket for a Virtual Screening of Corpus Christi, half of the ticket price comes right back to support Upstate Films. In these difficult times, it’s a great way to keep up with the best independent and international films, and to help the theater workers, distributors and filmmakers who are all struggling with this abrupt change of circumstances.


HUDSON VALLEY PICTURE SHOW

Corpus Christi is available from Film Movement, through the Film Movement Plus platform. Tickets are $12 per household, and you’ll have 72 hours to watch the movie after you purchase your ticket. When you make the purchase, you will receive an email from Film Movement with instructions on how to watch. You can watch on your browser, or stream with the Film Movement Plus App, which is available on most every common digital device (Apple, Roku, Amazon, Android…).

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Cold War

Academy Award Nominee – Best Cinematography, Best Director, Best Foreign Language Film
Like IDA, the director’s previous picture that won the Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film (2014), COLD WAR’s passionate love story about star-crossed lovers is set in the ruins of post-war Poland and Europe.
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Loving Vincent

LOVING VINCENT, the world’s first fully oil painted feature film, brings the artwork of Vincent van Gogh to life in an exploration of the complicated life and controversial death of one of history’s most celebrated artists.
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The 2015 Animated Oscar Nominated Short Films

In Woodstock 
Feb 14 15 16
See below for times
Watch the Oscar-nominated shorts before the Academy Awards on February 22nd! Upstate will screen the Live Action and the Documentary shorts this Saturday through Monday (Feb 14-15-16). The distributor of the Oscar shorts sent us basic ratings guidelines which we’ve included per category.
LIVE ACTION SHORTS PROGRAM: (118 mins)
(PG-13?) no violence or tragedy, some cursing, one of the strongest live action programs in a long time!
Rhinebeck: Wed (Feb 11) 8:10/Sat (Feb14) 8:15
Woodstock: Sat (Feb 14) 1:00
 

LIVE ACTION SHORTS

  • PARVANEH (Switzerland / Directed by Talkhon Hamzavi and Stefan Eichenberger)
  • BOOGALOO AND GRAHAM (UK / Directed by Michael Lennox and Ronan Blaney) 
  • AYA (Israel and France / Directed by Oded Binnun and Mihal Brezis) 
  • THE PHONE CALL (UK / Directed by Mat Kirkby and James Lucas) 
  • BUTTER LAMP (France and China / Directed by Hu Wei and Julien Féret)
DOCUMENTARY PROGRAM A: (81 mins):
(R?) A tough collection this year with films about cancer, slaughterhouse workers, and an infant with a rare respoiratory disorder. There are some tough to watch scenes in some that may be difficult for some. 
Rhinebeck Sun (Feb 15) 3:30/
Woodstock: Sun(Feb15) 1:30

documentary SHORTS

  • JOANNA (Poland / Directed by Aneta Kopacz)
  • CRISIS HOTLINE: VETERANS PRESS 1 (USA / Directed by Ellen Goosenberg Kent and Dana Perry)
DOCUMENTARY PROGRAM B: (79 mins):
(R?) There are some tough to watch scenes in THE REAPER and OUR CURSE that may be difficult for some.

Rhinebeck Mon (Feb 16) 3:30/
Woodstock Mon (Feb 16)4:30

  • OUR CURSE (Poland / Directed by Tomasz Sliwinski and Maciej Slesicki)
  • WHITE EARTH (USA / Directed by J. Christian Jensen)
  • THE REAPER (Mexico / Directed by Gabriel Serra Arguello)
View Oscar Shorts Website 

The 2015 Oscar Nominated Short Films

Coming Feb 13 – 19
Check showtimes 
Watch the Oscar-nominated shorts before the Academy Awards on February 22nd! Upstate will screen two of the shorts programs beginning Sat Feb 14. The distibutor of the Oscar shorts sent us basic ratings guidelines which we’ve included per category.
ANIMATED SHORTS PROGRAM: (82 mins)
(has shown already – twice in Rhinebeck/ once in Woodstock.
LIVE ACTION SHORTS PROGRAM: (118 mins)
(PG-13?) no violence or tragedy, some cursing, one of the strongest live action programs in a long time says Neal Block of Magnolia Films!
Rhinebeck: Sat (Feb14) 8:15
Woodstock: Sat (Feb 14) 1:00
 

LIVE ACTION SHORTS

  • PARVANEH (Switzerland / Directed by Talkhon Hamzavi and Stefan Eichenberger)
  • BOOGALOO AND GRAHAM (UK / Directed by Michael Lennox and Ronan Blaney) 
  • AYA (Israel and France / Directed by Oded Binnun and Mihal Brezis) 
  • THE PHONE CALL (UK / Directed by Mat Kirkby and James Lucas) 
  • BUTTER LAMP (France and China / Directed by Hu Wei and Julien Féret)
DOCUMENTARY PROGRAM A: (81 mins):
(R?) A tough collection this year with films about cancer, slaughterhouse workers, and an infant with a rare respoiratory disorder. There are some tough to watch scenes in some that may be difficult for some.
Rhinebeck Sun (Feb 15) 3:30/ Woodstock: Sun(Feb15) 1:30

documentary SHORTS

  • JOANNA (Poland / Directed by Aneta Kopacz)
  • CRISIS HOTLINE: VETERANS PRESS 1 (USA / Directed by Ellen Goosenberg Kent and Dana Perry)
DOCUMENTARY PROGRAM B: (79 mins):
(R?) There are some tough to watch scenes in THE REAPER and OUR CURSE that may be difficult for some.
Rhinebeck Mon (Feb 16) 3:30/Woodstock Mon (Feb 16)4:30

  • OUR CURSE (Poland / Directed by Tomasz Sliwinski and Maciej Slesicki)
  • WHITE EARTH (USA / Directed by J. Christian Jensen)
  • THE REAPER (Mexico / Directed by Gabriel Serra Arguello)
View Oscar Shorts Website 

Martin Scorsese Presents Masterpieces of Polish Cinema: Innocent Sorcerers

In Rhinebeck 
August 27
Wed 8:30
(Poland / 1960 / Dir by Andrzej Wajda)
Release date: December 17, 1960
Unrated / 88 mins.
While a student in the Łódź school, Jerzy Skolimowski (the author of Knife in the Water), cowrote Innocent Sorcerers with Andrzej Wajda. A love story and a portrait of young Poles in the 1950s the film tells the tale of two people meeting in a bar.
They don’t care about the future; their lives seem to consist of going out, playing jazz and having love affairs with no strings attached. The night begins for them with a seemingly simple scenario — from small talk to bed. But as dawn approaches, what starts as an insignificant episode grows in meaning. 1961 Edinburgh IFF – diploma.
More on the Scorsese Polish Films Series 

Martin Scorsese presents Masterpieces of Polish Cinema

scorsese
Series ongoing in both Rhinebeck and Woodstock
(Poland/1950s into the 1980s)
“In 2011, I had the opportunity to visit the Polish National Film School in Łódź, Poland, at the invitation of the great director, Andrzej Wajda. It was a trip I had wanted to make for years as I had long been drawn to the school and to Polish cinema from the time I was a film student at NYU, studying under my teacher and mentor, Haig Manoogian. It was at NYU—a school modeled after the legendary film program at Łódź – that I learned not just how films are made, but why.The school nurtured in me an unshakable belief in artistic expression grounded in Italian Neorealism, the French New Wave, the surreptitious poetry of the old Hollywood masters, and Polish cinema: the great, sweeping, humanistic, intimate and profound movies that were an integral part of what, looking back, seems more and more like a golden age of international cinema.”

 There are many revelations in the “Masterpieces of Polish Cinema” series and whether you’re familiar with some of these films or not, it’s an incredible opportunity to discover for yourself the great power of Polish cinema, on the big screen in brilliantly restored digital masters. — Martin Scorsese

“… This is a cinema of personal vision, social commitment and poetic responsibility from which we’ve all learned and which sets a high standard that, as a filmmaker, I strive to achieve with every film, every time out. Each of the films in this special series embodies what Wajda called “the ‘impertinent freedom of creativity in the cinema” These are films that have great emotional and visual power—they’re “serious” films that, with their depth, stand up to repeated viewings. The subtext of great conflict and cultural identity is universal, even if you don’t know the history of Poland, the themes in these films will resonate, as they did profoundly for me. There are many revelations in the “Masterpieces of Polish Cinema” series and whether you’re familiar with some of these films or not, it’s an incredible opportunity to discover for yourself the great power of Polish cinema, on the big screen in brilliantly restored digital masters. I hope you will enjoy these great films as much I do.Thanks to The Film Foundation and Milestone Films in the United States, and Propaganda Foundation, DI Factory and KinoRP in Poland for making this magnificent series possible.”
View Trailerclick for films and times

Camouflage – from Masterpieces of Polish Cinema

In Rhinebeck 
October 1
Wednesday 3:00
(Poland / 1976 /Written and Directed by Krzysztof Zanussi)
Unrated / 101 mins.
An ironical and absurd comedy, Camouflage transports us to a university summer school camp where the shallowness and cynicism of the academic milieu becomes apparent through the relationship between a young linguistics professor, Jaroslaw, and his diabolical senior colleague, Jakub.
“All people are conformists just like you and I,” exclaims the latter, protesting against the liberal teaching approach of Jaroslaw. Renowned contemporary Polish director Krzysztof Zanussi presents the deeply troubling premise of academic conformity with witty humor mocking the status quo. Not intended as a political film, Camouflage was harshly received by the Polish government, immediately landing on the year’s list of banned films. 1981 New York Film Critics Circle Awards – Special Award – winner. 1977 Polish Film Festival – Best Screenplay – winner, Best Actor (Zbigniew Zapasiewicz) – winner, Grand Prix Golden Lions – winner. 1978 Rotterdam IFF – Critics Award – winner. 1977 Tehran IFF – Best Directing – winner. 1981 New York Film Critics Circle Awards – Special Award – winner.
Link to the Polish Film Series 

Pharaoh

In Woodstock 
Oct 4
Sat 2:30
(Poland / 1965 / Directed by Jerzy Kawalerowicz)
Unrated / 153 mins.
An epic production, including battle scenes featuring thousands and refined choreography, Pharaoh focuses on the young Egyptian ruler, Ramses XIII who, with his young passions, love and idealism, has to face the cold pragmatism of dealing with the country’s external enemies and internal struggles.
His position reduced to but a figurehead, Ramses fights to regain power, ultimately falling to absolute control of knowledge by his priests. Riddled with psychological, moral, and philosophical questions on the nature of power, Pharaoh forgoes large battle scenes and romantic kisses in favor of a deeply meaningful artistic creation. Unfortunately, the German releasing firm that acquired the distribution rights to Pharaoh shortened the film for international release and then went bankrupt when there was little interest in the truncated version. Now restored to its original form, Pharaoh brandishes its heroism as a weapon — teaching all that noble defeat is better than silence in the face of morally corrupt politics. 1967 Academy Awards®, USA – Oscar® – nomination. 1966 Cannes Film Festival – Palme d’Or – nomination.
View TrailerRead more about the series