Dheepan

Winner of the Palme d’Or at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival, the new film from acclaimed director Jacques Audiard (A PROPHET, READ MY LIPS, RUST AND BONE) is a gripping tale of survival.

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Tale of Tales

Sea monsters, monarchs, ogres, and sorcerers: Salma Hayek and John C. Reilly star in this breathtaking Baroque fantasy from the visionary director of Gomorrah.
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The Measure of a Man

Vincent Lindon won this year’s French Cesar award for his role as Thierry, an unemployed everyman who submits to a series of quietly humiliating ordeals to find work in today’s neoliberal, technocratic economy.
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Mustang

Nominated for Best Foreign Language film — This amazing film is set in a Turkish village where five young orphaned sisters live under lock and key after offending a few “pious” neighbors.
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Breathe

Actress-turned-director Melanie Laurent’s second feature is essentially “Mean Girls” for the arthouse crowd. Based on Anne-Sophie Brasme’s novel of the same name, Laurent’s film focuses on a pair of mismatched French schoolgirls who become fast friends in the kind of consuming and obsessive way that should look familiar to plenty of viewers.
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Gemma Bovery

Now showing
in Rhinebeck
June 15 – 18
Mon-Tues 8:15
Wed 6:10 8:15
Thur 6:10 
(France, UK / 2014 / Directed by Anne Fontaine)
R / 99 mins. 
Director Anne (COCO BEFORE CHANEL) Fontaine’s clever adaptation of Posy Simmonds’ graphic novel is at once a cheeky literary mash-up, a sensuous romance, a witty feminist commentary and a heady celebration of French provincial life.
In this vibrant re-imagining of Madame Bovary, life imitates art in uncanny ways when earthy British beauty Gemma Bovery (Gemma Arterton) and her husband Charles (Jason Flemyng) move to a charming ramshackle old farmhouse in the very same Norman village where the novel was written a century earlier.  Their welcoming neighbor, Martin Joubert (Fabrice Luchini), becomes entranced with Gemma and sets out to guide her through her new surroundings. It doesn’t take long before he is drawing parallels between the literary and real life woman, while he insinuates himself into her life. As reality sets in on the fantasy of rural French domesticity, the Boverys’ marriage begins to fray and Gemma finds herself at loose ends. She soon catches the eye of a handsome young playboy and when her magnetic ex suddenly reappears, she finds herself at a crossroads and seems to be fulfilling Joubert’s worst fears that her destiny is linked to that of Flaubert’s doomed heroine. In French and English with subtitles. 
View TrailerRead a Review

Saint Laurent

Now showing
in Rhinebeck
June 1 – 4
Mon-Tue 5:20
Wed 2:30 7:45
Thur 7:45 
(France & Blegium / 2014 / Directed by Bertrand Bonello)
R / 150 mins.
A look at the life of French designer Yves Saint Laurent from the beginning of his career in 1958 when he met his lover and business partner, Pierre Berge.
“Featuring an amazing cast of French actors including Gaspard Ulliel, Lea Seydoux and Jeremie Renier, SAINT LAURENT beckons with the promise of an inside look at the hectic and mysterious world of fashion. Shepherding you past security with a flash of a V.I.P. all-access pass, it confers instant insider status made even more alluring by the element of time travel. It’s giddy, intoxicating, decidedly decadent feeling, but SAINT LAURENT is more than merely seductive. YSL’s commitment to elegance was all-consuming, and also represented a kind of transcendental consumerism. His life, or at least this movie’s idea of it, was both sumptuous and empty, hedonistic and sad. He was a creator and, even more, a collector, of attractive people, intense experiences and beautiful things.”—From A.O. Scott’s, New York Times review. In French with English subtitles. 
View TrailerRead more from A.O. Scott

Dior and I

Now showing
in Rhinebeck 
May 25 – 28
Mon-Tue 5:45
Wed 3:00 8:10
Thur 8:10 
(France / 2014 / Written and Directed by Frédéric Tcheng)
Unrated / 90 mins. 
Frédéric Tcheng’s solo directorial debut brings the viewer inside the storied world of the Christian Dior fashion house with a privileged, behind-the-scenes look at the creation of Raf Simons’ first haute couture collection as its new artistic director-a true labor of love created by a dedicated group of collaborators.
Melding the everyday, pressure-filled components of fashion with mysterious echoes from the iconic brand’s past, the film is also a colorful homage to the seamstresses who serve Simons’ vision. (C) Official Site.
View TrailerFilm website

Clouds of Sils Maria

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Now showing
in Woodstock 
Starts Friday
in Rhinebeck 
May 4 – 7
Mon-Thur 7:30
 (France/2014/dir by Olivier Assayas)
R / 124 mins
Juliette Binoche, Kristen Stewart, and Chloë Grace Moretz light up this exhilarating, behind-the-scenes look at art, acting and aging. 
Maria Enders (Juliette Binoche) is an actress at the peak of her international career who is asked to perform in a revival of the play that made her famous twenty years earlier. Back then she played the role of Sigrid, an alluring young woman who disarms and eventually drives her boss Helena to suicide. Now she is being asked to step into the other role, that of the older Helena. She departs with her assistant (Kristen Stewart) to rehearse in Sils Maria, a remote region of the Alps. A young Hollywood starlet with a penchant for scandal (Chloë Grace Moretz) is to take on the role of Sigrid, and Maria finds herself on the other side of the mirror, face to face with an ambiguously charming woman who is, in essence, an unsettling reflection of herself. (C) Sundance Selects
View TrailerRead NYTimes critics pick review

The Salt of the Earth

Now showing
in Rhinebeck
May 4 – 7 
Mon-Tue 5:50
Wed 3:15 5:50
Thur 5:50
(France, Brazil, Italy / 2015 / Directed by Wim Wenders & Juliano Ribeiro Salgado)
PG-13 / 110 mins. 
“For the last 40 years, the photographer Sebastião Salgado has been traveling through the continents, in the footsteps of an ever-changing humanity.
He has witnessed some of the major events of our recent history; international conflicts, starvation and exodus. He is now embarking on the discovery of pristine territories, of wild fauna and flora, and of grandiose landscapes as part of a huge photographic project, which is a tribute to the planet’s beauty. Sebastião Salgado’s life and work are revealed to us by his son, Juliano, who went with him during his last travels, and by Wim Wenders, himself a photographer.” – Sony Pictures Classics. In French, Portuguese, and English with subtitles. 
View TrailerRead a Review

The 2015 Animated Oscar Nominated Short Films

In Woodstock 
Feb 14 15 16
See below for times
Watch the Oscar-nominated shorts before the Academy Awards on February 22nd! Upstate will screen the Live Action and the Documentary shorts this Saturday through Monday (Feb 14-15-16). The distributor of the Oscar shorts sent us basic ratings guidelines which we’ve included per category.
LIVE ACTION SHORTS PROGRAM: (118 mins)
(PG-13?) no violence or tragedy, some cursing, one of the strongest live action programs in a long time!
Rhinebeck: Wed (Feb 11) 8:10/Sat (Feb14) 8:15
Woodstock: Sat (Feb 14) 1:00
 

LIVE ACTION SHORTS

  • PARVANEH (Switzerland / Directed by Talkhon Hamzavi and Stefan Eichenberger)
  • BOOGALOO AND GRAHAM (UK / Directed by Michael Lennox and Ronan Blaney) 
  • AYA (Israel and France / Directed by Oded Binnun and Mihal Brezis) 
  • THE PHONE CALL (UK / Directed by Mat Kirkby and James Lucas) 
  • BUTTER LAMP (France and China / Directed by Hu Wei and Julien Féret)
DOCUMENTARY PROGRAM A: (81 mins):
(R?) A tough collection this year with films about cancer, slaughterhouse workers, and an infant with a rare respoiratory disorder. There are some tough to watch scenes in some that may be difficult for some. 
Rhinebeck Sun (Feb 15) 3:30/
Woodstock: Sun(Feb15) 1:30

documentary SHORTS

  • JOANNA (Poland / Directed by Aneta Kopacz)
  • CRISIS HOTLINE: VETERANS PRESS 1 (USA / Directed by Ellen Goosenberg Kent and Dana Perry)
DOCUMENTARY PROGRAM B: (79 mins):
(R?) There are some tough to watch scenes in THE REAPER and OUR CURSE that may be difficult for some.

Rhinebeck Mon (Feb 16) 3:30/
Woodstock Mon (Feb 16)4:30

  • OUR CURSE (Poland / Directed by Tomasz Sliwinski and Maciej Slesicki)
  • WHITE EARTH (USA / Directed by J. Christian Jensen)
  • THE REAPER (Mexico / Directed by Gabriel Serra Arguello)
View Oscar Shorts Website 

A Tale of Winter

A tale of winter
 LEVIATHAN still delayed in transit! 
Monday
today  7:30 A TALE OF WINTER
(France/1992/Writer/Director Eric Rohmer)
unrated / 114 mins
Winter begins in summer on a beach-in a series of swift snippets in which a stunningly sexy young couple, Felicie (Charlotte Very) and Charles (Frederic Van Dren Driessche) romp, make love and must leave each other as the season quickly shifts.
For decades writer Eric Rohmer was the guiding light of the French auteur school of cinema, and part of the nouvelle vague. He honed his modest personal cinema making such films as MY NIGHT AT  MAUD’S, PAULINE AT THE BEACH, CLAIRE’S KNEE. For Rohmer love and sex are usually viewed morally and intellectually and discussed in depth. Here, however, we witness a young couple, Félicie and Charles, who meet while on holiday, have sex on a beach, and fall deeply in love at the end of summer. And as they must go their separate ways, she inadvertengly gives him the wrong address, and, as a result, he disappears from her life. Five years later, around Christmas time, Félicie is a hairdresser in the Paris suburbs with a daughter (Charles’) and two lovers: the successful hairstylist Maxence and the Catholic intellectual Loïc. She loves them both, but, as she says, “There’s love and love,” and the love that counts is the one she still holds for the long lost Charles. Félicie is one of the most fascinating in Rohmer’s distinguished line of heroines: impulsive, independent, thoughtlessly frank, disarmingly sincere, at once exasperating and enchanting.
View TrailerRead Review

The 2015 Oscar Nominated Short Films

Coming Feb 13 – 19
Check showtimes 
Watch the Oscar-nominated shorts before the Academy Awards on February 22nd! Upstate will screen two of the shorts programs beginning Sat Feb 14. The distibutor of the Oscar shorts sent us basic ratings guidelines which we’ve included per category.
ANIMATED SHORTS PROGRAM: (82 mins)
(has shown already – twice in Rhinebeck/ once in Woodstock.
LIVE ACTION SHORTS PROGRAM: (118 mins)
(PG-13?) no violence or tragedy, some cursing, one of the strongest live action programs in a long time says Neal Block of Magnolia Films!
Rhinebeck: Sat (Feb14) 8:15
Woodstock: Sat (Feb 14) 1:00
 

LIVE ACTION SHORTS

  • PARVANEH (Switzerland / Directed by Talkhon Hamzavi and Stefan Eichenberger)
  • BOOGALOO AND GRAHAM (UK / Directed by Michael Lennox and Ronan Blaney) 
  • AYA (Israel and France / Directed by Oded Binnun and Mihal Brezis) 
  • THE PHONE CALL (UK / Directed by Mat Kirkby and James Lucas) 
  • BUTTER LAMP (France and China / Directed by Hu Wei and Julien Féret)
DOCUMENTARY PROGRAM A: (81 mins):
(R?) A tough collection this year with films about cancer, slaughterhouse workers, and an infant with a rare respoiratory disorder. There are some tough to watch scenes in some that may be difficult for some.
Rhinebeck Sun (Feb 15) 3:30/ Woodstock: Sun(Feb15) 1:30

documentary SHORTS

  • JOANNA (Poland / Directed by Aneta Kopacz)
  • CRISIS HOTLINE: VETERANS PRESS 1 (USA / Directed by Ellen Goosenberg Kent and Dana Perry)
DOCUMENTARY PROGRAM B: (79 mins):
(R?) There are some tough to watch scenes in THE REAPER and OUR CURSE that may be difficult for some.
Rhinebeck Mon (Feb 16) 3:30/Woodstock Mon (Feb 16)4:30

  • OUR CURSE (Poland / Directed by Tomasz Sliwinski and Maciej Slesicki)
  • WHITE EARTH (USA / Directed by J. Christian Jensen)
  • THE REAPER (Mexico / Directed by Gabriel Serra Arguello)
View Oscar Shorts Website 

Two Days, One Night

 

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Now showing
in Rhinebeck
Feb 16 – 19
Mon 8:15
Tues 6:00 8:15
Wed 6:00 8:15
Thurs 6:00 8:15
(France/2014/Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardennes)
PG-13 / 95 mins
* Academy Award nominee for Best Actress
When the latest film from the celebrated Dardenne brothers (THE KID WITH THE BIKE, ROSETTA, THE CHILD,LA PROMESSE) Luc and Jean-Pierre, premiered at the 2014 Cannes Film Festival, Marion Cotillard’s performance was unanimously praised by critics, earned a 15 minute standing ovation, and was named “the best performance of the festival”. Oscar winner Marion (La Vie En Rose) Cotillard plays Sandra, a working-class wife and mother paralyzed by depression who, about to return to her job, learns her colleagues have just voted to get rid of her so that they can divide up her salary for their bonuses. 
twodaysBecause the vote was not quite proper, Sandra is given one weekend to convince her co-workers to keep her on but lose their bonuses. In the course of her surprisingly suspenseful efforts, Sandra finds out who her friends are, while the Dardennes compellingly map the rocky terrain of worker solidarity in contemporary Europe. Over the weekend, urged on by her husband and a friend, Sandra screws up her courage to confront each co-worker individually in order to win a majority of their votes before time runs out. The brothers Dardennes have turned a relevant social inquiry into a powerful statement on community solidarity, once again delivering a film that is simple on the surface but alive with both compassion and wisdom. In French with subtitles. 
View TrailerRead TimeOut London review

Mood Indigo

Coming Soon
(France, Belgium / 2013 / Directed by Michel Gondry)
Unrated / 131 mins. 
A powerful and accomplished film from director Michel Gondry (Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, The Science of Sleep), Mood Indigo tells the surreal and poetic tale of Colin (Romain Duris), an idealistic and inventive young man, and Chloé (Audrey Tautou), the stunning and quick-witted gal who captures his heart.
In a world where you can travel around on a pink cloud or be swept off an ice-skating rink into an inexplicable hole, Colin, a wealthy young man and inventor of the cocktail-mixing piano wants to fall in love. With the help of his cook Nicolas (Omar Sy) and his best friend Chick (Gad Elmaleh), he meets and falls for Chloé. But soon after their wedding, a water lily starts growing in Chloé’s chest and she falls ill. Ruined by medical expenses, Colin resorts to increasingly desperate methods to save his beloved’s life. Spiced by a cascade of surprising visual effects, Gondry’s fertile imagination summons the ghosts of Tex Avery, Jacques Tati, and Rube Golderg in this starry-eyed fantasia, pitched somewhere between the jazzy airiness of the French New Wave and the freewheeling nuttiness of Jean-Pierre Jeunet’s Delicatessen or Amélie. Unrated / 131 mins. In French with subtitles.
View TrailerRead a Review

Venus in Fur

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Now showing
in Rhinebeck 
July 21 – 24
Mon Tues 8:20
Wed 3:30 6:00
Thurs 6:00
(Ends Thursday)
(France/2014/dir by Roman Polanski)
unrated / 96 mins
David Ives’ Tony Award-winning Broadway play, based on Leopold von Sacher-Masoch’s groundbreaking novella, is the latest film from Roman Polanski. 
After a long day auditioning actresses for his play, writer-director Thomas (Mathieu Amalric) is on the phone with his fiancee complaining about his wasted day auditioning a bevy of lame actresses. As they make plans to meet, in strides Vanda (Emmanuelle Seigner) a whirlwind of erotic energy who convinces him to give her a chance to audition for the role of a woman who enters into an agreement with her male counterpart to dominate him as her slave. At first she seems to embody everything Thomas finds wrong. She is pushy, foul-mouthed, desperate and seemingly ill-prepared, but when he reluctantly agrees to let her read for the part, he is stunned and captivated. Not only is Vanda a perfect fit, but she apparently has researched the role exhaustively, learned her lines by heart and even brought her own props. The likeness proves to be much more than skin-deep. As the extended “audition” builds momentum, Thomas moves from attraction to obsession until, with Vanda taking an ever more dominant role, the balance of power shifts.
View TrailerRead NYTimes 

The Blue Room

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Now Showing
in Woodstock 
Moves to Rhinebeck 
Oct 15Oct 20 – 23 
Wed 7:30 (last show)
(France2014/dir by Mathieu Almaric)
R / 77 mins
Two adulterous lovers go from pillow talk to possible murder in this sexy, brain-teasing thriller based on a Georges Simenon thriller.
Mathieu Amalric (The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, Grand Budapest Hotel) directs and stars as Julien, a middle-aged farm equipment salesman embroiled in a steamy love affair with a married woman who, after a round of kinky sex, makes a startling suggestion. Suddenly Julien is caught up in a police investigation-but just what exactly happened? Based on a novel by celebrated crime writer Georges Simenon, this beguiling cinematic puzzle unfolds in an elliptical style that circles back time and time again to keep us connected. 
View TrailerRead NYTimes Critics Pick!

A Summer’s Tale

Now showing
in Rhinebeck 
July 7 – 10
Mon 5:45 8:10
Tues 5:45 8:10
Wed 3:15 5:45
Thur 5:45 8:10 (last show)
(France / 1996 / Directed by Eric Rohmer)
G / 113 mins.
Gaspard (Melvil Poupaud), a recent university graduate, arrives at the seaside in Bretagne for three weeks’ vacation before starting a new job. He’s hoping his sort-of girlfriend, the fickle Léna (Aurélia Nolin), will join him there; but as the days pass, he welcomes the interest of Margot (Amanda Langlet, the titular character from Rohmer’s Pauline at the Beach), a student of ethnology working as a waitress for the summer.
Things start to get complicated when the spoken-for Margot encourages Gaspard to have a summer romance with her friend, Solène (Gwenaëlle Simon), and he complies. When Léna turns up, and scheduling complications abound, Gaspard will have to make a choice. Rohmer’s characteristically light touch allows his characters to discourse on love and friendship, even as their body language complicates and even contradicts their words. Diane Baratier’s cinematography perfectly captures the languor of youth and the feeling of a French beach vacation—the sea, the sunlight and the lovely surroundings convey the openness of a world of possibilities faced by these young people. – Big World Pictures
In French with subtitles. 
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The Last of the Unjust

Now showing
in Rhinebeck 
May 7
Wed 1:30 
(France, Austria / 2014 / Directed by Claude Lanzmann)
Claude (Shoah) Lanzmann continues to investigate the Holocaust here focusing on the controversial Rabbi Benjamin Murmelstein, the last President of the Jewish Council in the Theresienstadt ghetto in Czechoslovakia.
After he revisited his 1975 interviews filmed in Rome with Murmelstein, the leader of the town “given to the Jews by Hitler,” a ghetto of deceit chosen by Adolf Eichmann to dupe the world, Lanzmann decided he must make this film to provide some insight into the genesis of the Final Solution, to counter the notion of the banality of evil, and to revisit the savage contradictions of the Jewish Councils focusing on the only “Elder of the Jews” not to have been killed during the war, and who helped about 121,000 Jews leave the country. In English, German, and French with subtitles.
PG-13 / 220 mins.
View Trailer
Read a Review

Blue is the Warmest Color

In Rhinebeck  
Nov 18 – 21
 
Mon 7:30
Tues 7:30
Wed 2:20 8:10
Thur 7:30 (last show)

 
(France / 2013 / Directed by Abdellatif Kechiche)
NC-17 / 179 mins.
Based on a graphic novel about a teenage girl who falls in love with a slightly older woman, this masterpiece about heartbreak and self-discovery was the sensation at this year’s Cannes Film Festival.
Adèle (Adèle Exarchopoulos), a quiet 17 year-old high schooler, lives with her middle-class parents outside the northern French city of Lille. After an unsuccessful relationship with a charming fellow student (Jeremie Laheurte), she enters the embraces of the alluring, blue-haired Emma (Léa Seydoux), a lesbian graduate student from a bourgeois-bohemian family. At first, the two are magnetic. But as class becomes a sneakily toxic force in their relationship, the film becomes a study of the ways socioeconomic differences come to bear on romantic life. Brilliantly acted and intensely erotic, Kechiche’s film has been instantly likened to Ang Lee’s Brokeback Mountain as one of the great big-screen same-sex romances to date. By the time it reaches its final shot, Blue becomes an experience that will leave viewers dizzy, exhilarated, and deeply moved. In French with subtitles.
View TrailerRead Reviews

In the House

Coming Soon 
  
(France / 2012 / Directed by Francois Ozon)
R / 105 mins.
French auteur Francois Ozon adapts Juan Mayorga’s The Boy in the Last Row to tell a tale about the seductive charms of storytelling and the dangerous implications of writing what you know.
An innocent-looking student from a working-class family, sixteen-year-old Claude (Ernst Umhauer) keeps a low profile. But his teacher Germain (Fabrice Luchini) soon comes to realize that he is a pupil of rare gifts. Despite his shyness, Claude has a way of getting close to people, penetrating their private domains and observing their lives. Entranced by his writing, Germain goads his pupil on to increasingly extreme acts, becoming a willing accomplice in his questionable methods of collecting material. With taut dialogue, crisp style, and a uniformly brilliant cast (including Kristin Scott Thomas and Emmanuelle Seigner), In the House is a smooth and crystalline thriller. In French with subtitles.
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Staff Pick: The River

In Rhinebeck 
Sunday Sept 8 
8:15*   
(France, India, USA / 1951 / Directed by Jean Renoir)
Unrated / 99 mins.
* Special Staff Pick presentation by Joel Griffith
Rules of the Game? Didn’t do much for me. But Renoir’s 1951 technicolor masterpiece The River, shot entirely in Bengal, utterly seduced me the first time I saw it! It follows a year in the life of an upper­ middle class British family living in a gated villa on the banks of the Ganges just after WWII.
Eldest of the prosperous mill manager’s five children is innocent, awkward Harriet, who plays with her siblings, and pens poems in the shade­dappled garden. We meet her on the brink of adolescence, but when the worldly, wounded, GI Captain John comes to stay next door, Harriet is dragged painfully and inexorably into adulthood. Renoir interweaves this coming of age tale with colorful scenes of daily life on the ever­rolling river; his palette and compositions intoxicate like the canvases of his impressionist father. Tired of today’s fast­cut, special­ effects saturated, blockbuster tedium? This gorgeous, slow­flowing film is the perfect change of pace! – Joel Griffith
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Mr. Klein

Jake Haisley’s staff pick! 
Coming Soon 
Check back for a showtime 
(France and Italy / 1976 / Directed by Joseph Losey)
UR / 123 mins.
Exiled American filmmaker Joseph Losey’s first French language film, Monsieur Klein is a stunning achievement of style and storytelling whose depiction of moral indifference in Nazi Occupied France struck a nerve with French audiences when released in 1976.
Parisian art dealer Robert Klein (Alain Delon) exploits the urgency of Jews preparing to flee by buying their art cheaply. His comfortable arrangement is upended, however, when a mysterious doppelganger, a Jewish Robert Klein, appears in his neighborhood, drawing the suspicion of authorities and setting him on a morally dubious mission to uncover the shadowy double and clear his identity to the police. Monsieur Klein is both a spellbinding, psychologically revealing noir and a powerful indictment of political disengagement in the face of inhumanity and injustice.
  

On the Road

In Woodstock
Apr 12 – 18
Fri 7:30
Sat 4:45 7:30
Sun 2:45 5:30
Mon 7:30
Tues 7:30
Wed 7:30
Thur 7:30
(France and Brazil / 2012 / Directed by Walter Salles)
R / 129 mins.
Best known for transferring Che Guevara’s The Motorcycle Diaries to film, director Walter Salles crafts a version of Kerouac’s book that lovingly reveals the flip side of American conformity in all its unkempt and poetic glory.
An icon of American fiction, Sal Paradise (Sam Riley) takes a trip through the highways and byways of the nation, storing up a stash of memories that will serve him well as a writer. Cruising in a beat-up car with Dean Moriarty (Garrett Hedlund), Marylou Henderson (Kristen Stewart), and Carlo Marx (Tom Sturridge), the travelers aim to explore any state of ecstasy that opens up before them. But hedonism, even of the transcendental kind, has its limits. Dean is handsome and energetic, a personification of fifties cool. Yet he is also deeply flawed, and the power of both novel and film lies in the manner in which Sal starts to see through his best friend. Accompanied by a jazzy soundtrack, elegant camerawork, and a talented supporting cast (including Kirsten Dunst, Amy Adams, Steve Buscemi and Viggo Mortensen), On the Road never loses sight of how young and innocent everyone is, or of how close “the edge of sanity and experience” stands to a moment of reckoning.
View TrailerRead Reviews

Zazie dans le Metro

In Rhinebeck 
June 9
Sunday 8:10
(France & Italy / 1960 / Directed by Louis Malle)
Unrated / 89 mins.
Jake Haisley’s staff pick.
The third feature from director Louis Malle (Au Revoir Les Enfants, My Dinner With Andre), Zazie Dans le Metro is a delightfully frenetic romp through the streets of early 60s Paris, following the exploits of Zazie, a precocious, irreverent, and eminently mischievous ten year old looking to make the most of her weekend in the city.
A mix of light-hearted satire and brash slapstick with a healthy dose of surrealistic weirdness, Zazie‘s bright, fluid cinematography and wildly playful editing style capture a more off-color Paris that belies the romance and mystique that frequently characterize the city on film. With puckish disregard for conventions of cinematic storytelling, Zazie packs dual punch of inventiveness and attitude that sets it apart even among the boundary-pushing films of the French New Wave. – Jake Haisley. In French and Russian with subtitles.
View TrailerRead Reviews

Renoir

 

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May 27
Mon 5:30

(France 2013/dir by Gilles Bourdos)
R / 111 mins
Set on the French Riviera in the summer of 1915, a pivotal moment in the lives of celebrated Impressionist painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir and his war-wounded son Jean, this lushly atmospheric drama is a story of the generations as creative powers wax and wane with inspiration from a lovely artist’s model.
The elder Renoir is filled with a new, wholly unexpected energy when a young girl miraculously enters his world. Blazing with life, radiantly beautiful, Andrée will become his last model, and the impetus for a remarkable rejuvenation. At the same time his middle son Jean returns from WWI and comes under the spell of the free-spirited young Andrée who is in love with cinema. Their beautiful home and majestic countryside grounds reverberate with familial intrigue, as both Renoirs, père et fils, become smitten with the enchanting and headstrong young muse. Cast includes Michel Bouquet, Christa Theret, Romane Bohringer. In French with subtitles.
View TrailerRead Reviews

Chicken With Plums

Coming Soon

(France, Germany, Belgium / 2011 / directed by Marjane Satrapi and Vincent Paronnaud)
PG-13 / 93 mins.
A live-action follow-up to the animated Persepolis, this sophisticated fable about the damage done when a young couple is forced to part unfolds like a fantasy, drenched in the colors of 1950s Iran.
After an unexpected brush with a long-lost love, celebrated violinist Nasser Ali Khan (Mathieu Amalric) returns home to an argument with his wife and the discovery that his prized violin is broken. Unable to conceive of life without the consolation of music, he soon finds that he can’t get out of bed. Drifting somewhere between fantasy and oblivion, he is riddled with visions. Blending the fantastic with piercing emotional truths, the film’s bold visual design and adventurous structure are fully matched by gorgeous performances from Mathieu Amalric, Isabella Rossellini, Maria de Medeiros and Chiara Mastroianni. A whimsical, nostalgic delight, Chicken With Plums artfully glances at its cinematic past while staying open to parallel forms of presentation and play. In English and French with subtitles.
View TrailerRead Reviews

Farewell My Queen


Dec 10 – 13
Mon 7:30
Tue 7:30
Wed 7:30
Thur 7:30 (last show)
(France / 2012 / Benoit Jacquot)
R / 100 mins
*This film will only play in Woodstock. It will not move to Rhinebeck, but it’s a great movie. Catch it if you can!*
Acclaimed director Benoît Jacquot (A Single Girl, Sade) brilliantly captures the passions, debauchery, and ultimately the chaos that engulfed the court of Marie Antoinette (Diane Kruger) in the final days before the outbreak of the French Revolution.
Based on the best-selling novel by Chantal Thomas, the film stars Léa Seydoux as one of Marie’s ladies-in-waiting, seemingly an innocent but quietly working her way into her mistress’s special favors, until history tosses her fate onto a decidedly different path. With the action moving effortlessly from the gilded drawing rooms of the nobles to the back quarters of those who serve them, this is a period film at once accurate and sumptuous in its visual details and modern in its emotions. In French with subtitles – (Cohen Media)
View TrailerRead Reviews

Holy Motors

Jan 28 – 31
Mon 7:30
Tue 7:30
Wed 7:30
Thur 7:30
(France & Germany / 2012 / Written and Directed by Leos Carax)
Unrated / 115 mins.
The first full-length feature in 10 years from Leos Carax (Boy Meets Girl, Lovers on the Bridge, Pola X) is an exhilarating, nostalgic love letter to movies. Stunning to look at, Holy Motors is so hard to describe, in the words of one reviewer, “it could almost be a film made in a time before language, a rendering of modern life – or modern lives – as a kind of cinematic cave painting. With songs. And a white stretch limo.” – Stephanie Zacharek, NPR
At its center is Denis Lavant, who stars as Monsieur Oscar, a man with a very important job. Chauffeured to a series of “appointments” by Celine (Edith Scob), an elegant specter of a woman in a chic pantsuit, Oscar uses his limo’s back seat as a dressing room, where he transforms himself into various guises. As we watch him slip in and out of people’s lives at each stop – acting as a hit man, a tycoon, a gypsy beggar, and the former lover of a mysterious woman – it becomes unclear… Is Oscar a secret agent? A performance artist? A purveyor of dreams? Does it really matter? Carax is so in love with film, as well as with life itself, that he gives us an experience like no other. Shot in Paris, his dreamscape takes shape in elegant cemeteries and abandoned department stores, in nighttime streets and infrared boulevards glowing green and orange. Through its cracks and pulses, one thing’s for sure: This is a movie where chaos, compassion, melancholy, and joy exist in equal measure. It’s all there.
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Rust and Bone

Jan 21 – 24
Mon 3:30 6:00 8:15
Tue 6:00 8:15
Wed 6:00 8:15
Thur 6:00 8:15 (last show)


(France / 2012 / Directed by Jacques Audiard)
R / 120mins
*Golden Globe nominee for Best Actress and Best Foreign Language Film*
Having made at least three fascinating films (A Prophet, The Beat My Heart Skipped, and Read My Lips), Jacques Audiard’s latest is a tale in which individual lives and destinies are blown out of proportion, intensified by drama and accident.
Ali (Matthias Schoenaerts – recently on screen here in Bullhead), is a penniless and friendless single parent with a five year old child in tow who seeks refuge with his sister Anna (Corinne Masiero) in the sunny south of France. Life improves, and he soon finds work as a bouncer at a nightclub while not bare-knuckle boxing for money. When breaking up a bar brawl, he connects momentarily with the lovely Stephanie (Marion Cotillard). But when her job training killer whales at a seaquarium leads to near-tragedy, they reconnect in a tender yet unsentimental portrayal of pitiless love and navigate a world where trust, truth, loyalty and love cannot be bought and sold, and courage comes in many forms.
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The Well-Digger’s Daughter

Sept 17 – 20
Mon 5:50
Tue 5:50
Wed 5:50
Thu 5:50 (last show)

(France / 2012 / dir by Daniel Auteuil)
Unrated / 105 mins.
Twenty-five years after his roles in two films based on Marcel Pagnol, Jean de Florette and Manon of the Spring brought him international acclaim, Daniel Auteuil directs and stars in his remake of Pagnol’s 1940s classic.
Set in Provence on the cusp of WWI, hard working well-digger Pascal Amoretti (Auteuil), a widower raising six daughters, welcomes his eldest daughter, 18 year old Patricia (Astrid Bergès-Frisbey), home from Paris to help raise her sisters. He grants his well-digging assistant Felipe (Kad Merad) permission to ask for her hand, but this plan is shattered once Patricia meets Jacques (Nicolas Duvauchelle), the dashing and cocky flying ace son of a wealthy family. An exquisitely crafted, sun-drenched melodrama, set to a score by Academy Award-nominee Alexandre Desplat (The King’s Speech), the moving tale of love and class conflict captures all the warmth and humanist spirit of Pagnol’s original work. In French with subtitles.
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The Fairy



June 20 – 21
Wed 6:00
Thu 6:00 (last show)

(France, Belgium / 2012 / Wr and Dir by Dominique Abel, Fiona Gordon, Bruno Romy)
UR / 93mins.

In the Keystone-spirit of Chaplin and Keaton, with the precision of Tati’s visual comedy, a whimsical tale of a man, a fairy, and his three wishes.
In the droll port city of Le Havre, a hotel night clerk’s sleepy evening in front of the TV is interrupted by the arrival of a slender shoeless woman.  Announcing herself a fairy, she grants Dom three wishes.  He gets his wish of a scooter with an lifetime supply of gas, but what he wants is the love of the fairy herself.  The playful and jovial atmosphere is punctured at times by more somber notes, such as when they cross paths with African immigrants trying to stow away on a ferry bound for England, or when the fairy is committed to an asylum.  In French with English subtitles.
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The Intouchables

Nov 5 – 8
Mon 7:30
Tue 7:30
Wed 7:30
Thur 7:30 (last show)

(France / 2012 / written and directed Olivier Nakache and Éric Toledano )
R / 112 mins
An irreverent, uplifting comedy about trust and human possibility based on a true story about an unlikely friendship between a wealthy quadriplegic and a streetwise ex-con.
Philippe (Francois Cluzet) is paralyzed from the neck down as a result of a paragliding accident. He lives in a luxurious Paris apartment with his teenage daughter and members of his staff. Since his accident he has gone through a series of caregivers, and is about to interview more when Driss (Omar Sy) barges into the interview room simply hoping to get someone to sign a form saying he applied for a job and was rejected so that he can receive unemployment benefits. Something about this Senegalese man’s vitality appeals to Philippe, and he hires this brash young man for a trial month. What ensues is an adventure in informal, playful care-giving that boasts primo performances by the two men.
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The Artist


Mar 12 – 15
Mon 7:30
Tue 7:30
Wed 7:30
Thu 7:30
 (last show)

(France / 2011 / dir by Michel Hazanavicius)
PG-13 / 98 mins
Winner of 5 Academy Awards… A playful homage/love letter to 1920’s Hollywood about a star of silent films at the dawn of the “talkies.”  Filmed entirely in black and white with no dialogue and in the traditional 1.33 aspect ratio, THE ARTIST revels in the cinematic possibilities of the golden age of silent cinema.
George Valentin (Jean Dujardin who won best actor at Cannes) is at the height of his career in 1927.  While attending the premiere of his newest film he bumps into a gorgeous unknown actress, Peppy Miller (Berenice Bejo), and the photo’s of their run-in set her on a path of unexpected fame.  George falls on hard times as audiences flock to the new sound films, going broke when he self-finances his own feature.  As Peppy’s fame grows, George is abandoned by his wife and his fans, but she resolves to help the man who set her career into motion.
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Carnage

  
Jan 30 – Feb 2
Mon 6:00 8:10
Tue 6:00 8:10
Wed 6:00 8:10
Thu 6:00 8:10 (last show)

(France / 2011 / dir by Roman Polanski)
R / 79 mins
Two sets of parents decide to have a sit-down together after their sons are involved in a fight at school.  Politeness gives way to chaos as the social proprieties of the group erode.
Alan and Nancy arrive to Michael and Penelope’s apartment hoping to wrap things up quickly, keeping their coats on, even making for the elevator only to be pulled back into the living room where the drama of the film begins to unfold.  As Michael starts to pour generous portions of scotch for his guests, their inhibitions fall away and things spiral out of control as the once civil characters to begin calling each other criminals and murderers.  Directed by Roman Polanski, and based on the acclaimed play “God of Carnage”, by Yasmina Reza, Carnage stars John C. Reilly, Jodie Foster, Christoph Waltz, and Kate Winslet.
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The Hedgehog

hedgy

Dec 12 – 15

Mon 7:30
Tue 7:30
Wed 7:30
Thu 7:30 (last show)

(France & Italy / 2010 / dir by Mona Achace)
Unrated / 100 mins.
Adapted from the novel by Muriel Barbary, The Hedgehog is an engaging character story about a privileged young girl who declares that she will kill herself on her next birthday, a deeply private building concierge, and the unlikely friend who helps them shed their prickly exteriors.
Set almost entirely in an upper-class apartment building, the film begins with 11 year-old Paloma (Garance Le Guillermic) telling her high-end video camera that although her family is wealthy and privileged, she believes her life as an adult will be hollow. To illustrate just how well off she is, the film cuts immediately to Renee (Josiane Balasko), the 50 year-old concierge who lives below. When Mr. Ozu (Togo Igawa) moves in to the building, his warmth and genuine interest in those around him profoundly affect both Renee and Paloma. As the characters come to life, the film’s humor and drama flow naturally and steadily, lending subtlety to this touching study of character, class, and companionship. In French with subtitles.
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France / 2010 / dir by Alain Corneau

Love Crime



Oct 17 – 20
Mon 5:45
Tue 5:45
Wed 8:00
Thu 8:00

(France / 2010 / dir by Alain Corneau)
Unrated / 104 mins.
Kristen Scott Thomas (The English Patient) and Ludivine Sagnier (Swimming Pool) star in this delicious cat-and-mouse thriller about two women vying for power in the cut-throat world of multinational business.
The ingenue assistant to a senior executive, Isabelle (Sagnier) works late hours doing grunt work in efforts to rise to success. When her boss, Christine (Scott Thomas), starts stealing her ideas and claiming them as her own, the ground is prepared for all-out war. As the women become embroiled in a power struggle that’s rife with sexual tension and vengeful twists and turns, director Alain Corneau (Tous les Matins du Monde) keeps a devilish plot under such fine control that he seduces us into going along for the ride.
In French and English with subtitles.
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France / 2010 / dir by Alain Corneau

Mozart’s Sister

mozart's sister


Oct 17 – 20
Mon 5:45 8:15
Tue 5:45 8:15
Wed 5:45 8:15
Thu 5:45 8:15

(France / 2011 / Dir by René Féret)
Unrated / 120 mins
If one were a gifted musician and composer, female, and coming of age in 1763, you would find roads to musical fulfillment closed off… this is the story of Wolfgang’s older sister Maria Anna “Nannerl” Mozart.
As their strict but loving father Leopold (Marc Barbe) tours his talented offspring in front of the royal courts of pre-French revolution Europe, his talented daughter approaches marriageable age and is forbidden to play the violin or compose. Instead she is made to accompany her younger brother who takes center stage competing for royal handouts. Maria Anna “Nannerl” Mozart (Marie Féret) chafes at the limitations imposed on her gender, but a friendship with the son and daughter of Louis XV offers an alternative. The art direction and costumes along with some exquisite locations and scenes shot inside Versailles bring the 1760s alive, and of course music plays a major role, with Marie-Jeanne Serrero’s soundtrack featuring apocryphal music by Nannerl Mozart. In French with English subtitles.
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Names of Love

Names of Love
Oct 3 – Oct 6
Mon: 8:15
Tues: 8:15
Wed: 6:00
Thur: 6:00



(France / 2010 / directed by Michel Leclerc)
Unrated / 95 mins.
A free-spirited young woman, comfortable with her sexuality, is just as happy with her clothes off as on in this trenchant comedy about identity, the duty to remember, and family secrets. Bahia Benmahmoud (Sara Forestier), who is part Algerian, seduces conservative French men and when they’re at their most vulnerable, whispers things like “not all Algerians are thieves” in their ears.
When she meets Arthur Martin (Jacques Gamblin), a somewhat shut-down, middle-aged bird flu expert, her life changes. He’s a seemingly French everyman (15,000 of his countrymen have the same name) who’s new to love and life and who’s been shielded from his own family’s history. But Arthur doesn’t play Bahia’s game and that only encourages her. Told with some bold cinematic flourishes, this satire of sexual politics and pop culture works even if you don’t get all the cultural references; e.g., a cameo by former socialist pm Lionel Jospin. Winner 2011 Cesars, Best actress and Best original screenplay. In French and Arabic with subtitles.
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France / 2010 / dir by Alain Corneau

Lebanon

Lebanon
Starts Saturday, Jan. 15 – 17, 3 shows in Rhinebeck Only
Sat 3:20
Sun 8:30
Mon 8:30
(France, Germany, Israel / 2009 / dir by Samuel Maoz)
The eighth film in our Well Worth Watching Series… Like the acclaimed Waltz With Bashir, Lebanon – set entirely within an armored tank – depicts Israeli soldiers’ memories of events that occurred in 1982.
As four grime-streaked, twenty-something soldiers follow orders to “clean up” a Lebanese town, they realize they have driven into a lethal trap and grow panicked. Inside the tank, director Samuel Maoz crafts a claustrophobic atmosphere that amplifies the terror of their situation. The noises that surround them are deafening; the chaos of the outside world is seen only through the cross-hairs of the gun barrel; and frequent tight close-ups show us the fear in the soldiers’ eyes. Based on actual events, Lebanon stands as a high-voltage portrait of how fear redefines young men when they are handed a gun and told to kill for their country.
R / 94 mins.
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Heartbreaker

November 15 – 18
Mon 8:15
Tue 8:15
Wed 6:00
Thur 6:00 – Last Show
(France / 2010 / dir by Pascal Chaumeil)
A delicious, sexy confection, HEARTBREAKER is a romantic comedy featuring two of the brightest young stars of contemporary French cinema – Romain Duris and Vanessa Paradis.
Duris stars as Alex, the rakish title character – a seducer-for-hire who’s paid to steal away women stuck in loveless relationships. His one rule – to never disrupt a happy couple – is tested when he finds himself heavily indebted to some unsavory characters. In order to pay them back, Alex takes on a lucrative job – to travel to Monte Carlo and stop wealthy bride-to-be Juliette (Paradis) from marrying the man of her dreams. Full of nimble comedy and effortless French cool, HEARTBREAKER is a winsome, winning trifle. In French with English subtitles.
Unrated / 105 mins.
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Soul Kitchen

Soul Kitchen
October 25 – 28
Mon 5:50 8:10
Tue 5:50 8:10
Wed 5:50 8:10
Thur 5:50 8:10 – Last Show
(France, Germany, Italy / 2009 / dir by Fatih Akin)
One of the most inspired voices in contemporary European cinema, filmmaker Fatih (Head On, Edge of Heaven) Akin turns to farce in this ragtag comedy in which a bunch of living-on-the-margins characters collide in the same restaurant.
Soul Kitchen is a restaurant in a scruffy neighborhood of Hamburg whose anguished proprietor, Zinos (Adam Bousdoukos), can’t decide whether to stay and fight for his business or chase his wayward girlfriend to Shanghai. With bills, a bad back, and a temperamental, haute-cuisine chef (played ferociously by Head On’s protagonist Biron Unel), Zinos leans toward splitting for China. But when his ne’er-do-well brother, Illias (Moritz Bleibtreu), gambles the property away, Zinos gets a reality check about what matters the most to him. Featuring a toe-tapping Motown soundtrack, Soul Kitchen hits the spot. In German with subtitles.
Unrated / 99 mins.
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Farewell

Farewell
September 27 – 30
Mon 5:45 8:10
Tues 5:45 8:10
Wed 5:45 8:10 – LAST SHOW
Thur W.F.F. begins
(France / 2009 / dir by Christian Carion)
The Soviet Union fell; Reagan got the credit, Gorbachev the glory, but it was an intrepid Soviet KGB agent who truly paved the way.
Colonel Grigoriev (Emir Kusturica), deeply dissatisfied with Brezhnev and Soviet society, decided to change the course of history-not for gold, but for a better future for his son. He adroitly dodged Soviet surveillance in the early 1980s, giving away important Soviet secrets to the government of French President François Mitterrand (Philippe Magnan), employing a French engineer (Guillaume Canet) working in Moscow as his go-between. Gripping and tragic, a tale of headlong heroism. Also with Willem Dafoe and Fred Ward as Reagan. In English, French and Russian with subtitles.
Unrated / 113 mins.
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The Concert

The Concert
September 20 – 23
Mon 5:50 8:20
Tue 5:50 8:20
Wed 5:50 8:20
Thur 5:50 8:20 – Last Show
(France/Italy/Romania/Belgium/Russia/ 2009 / dir by Radu Mihaileanu)
At one time, Andreï Filipov was a celebrated conductor of the Bolshoi Orchestra-the greatest orchestra in Russia-until he ran afoul of the Soviet communists for refusing to get rid of all his Jewish players-Zionists and enemies of the People-including his best friend Sacha Grossman.
Now 50, Andreï is still employed by the Bolshoi, but as a janitor. When he finds a fax inviting the orchestra to play in Paris, Andreï decides to round up his old musician buddies- a motley bunch now scraping by as cab drivers, flea market traders, suppliers of porno film sound effects-and go to Paris as the Bolshoi. They’ll defy destiny and take their revenge! Will they make it? In French and Italian with subtitles.
Unrated / 119 mins.
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Wild Grass

Wild Grass
August 6 – 12
Fri 4:40 7:10
Sat 7:10 9:30
Sun 4:40 7:10
Mon 6:10
Tues 6:10
Wed 8:30
Thur 8:30 – LAST SHOW
(France/Italy / 2009 / dir by Alain Resnais)
This unusual film by 88-(!)-year-old Alain Resnais (NIGHT AND FOG, HIROSHIMA MON AMOUR, Last Year at Marienbad, etc etc etc) focuses on themes of middle-aged malaise, chance, and the lengths to which some people will go in order to explore their fantasies.
After Marguerite (Sabine Azéma)’s purse is stolen, married Georges (André Dussollier) finds her red wallet. Something about her piques his interest, and, becoming curious to the point of stalkerism, Georges is determined to find Marguerite. His actions set off a romantic adventure from their strange connection. Based on Christian Gailly’s novel The Incident. Cast also includes Mathieu Amalric. In French with subtitles.
PG / 104 mins.
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Micmacs

Micmacs
June 28 – July 1
Mon 6:00 8:15
Tues 6:00 8:15
Wed 6:00 8:15
Thur 6:00 8:15 – Last Show

(France / 2009 / dir by Jean-Pierre Jeunet)
From the amazingly fertile imagination of Jean-Pierre Jeunet (AMELIE, DELICATESSEN, CITY OF LOST CHILDREN) comes this David vs Goliath story about a band of scavengers who take on weapons manufacturers.
Bazil (Danny Boon), a gentle-natured dreamer, doesn’t have much luck with weapons: after his father is killed by a landmine, he’s caught in a gun battle, and a bullet becomes permanently lodged in his brain. Taken in by a crew of friendly junk dealers, Bazil and his band of eccentric scavengers set out to get even with the arms manufacturers who caused his misfortunes. With its masterful gags and ultra-modern Parisian set, Jeunet’s latest is a visual treat that evokes the humor of Buster Keaton and the imagination of Jacques Tati. In French with subtitles.
R / 105 mins.
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Coco Chanel & Igor Stravinsky

Coco Chanel & Igor Stravinsky
July 12 – 15
Mon 7:30
Tues 7:30
Wed 7:30
Thur 7:30 – LAST SHOW
(France / 2009 / dir by Jan Kounen)
In 1920s France, Coco Chanel (Anna Mouglalis) and Igor Stravinsky (Mads Mikkelsen) meet and passionately love each other before going their separate ways.
Unlike most of the audience at the the premiere of Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring, Coco Chanel is mesmerized. When they meet years later, Chanel learns that the composer is penniless, and she offers Stravinsky and his family the use of her villa. But what begins as an act of compassion turns into an intense love affair, to the chagrin of Stravinsky’s consumptive wife (Elena Morozova). Standing at the intersection of art, culture, style, and genius, Kounen’s film offers a glimpse into their legendary lives. In French, Russian & English with subtitles.
R / 120 mins.
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Zidane: A 21st Century Portrait

Zidane
Sunday, June 27th
Free Show – 12:00pm
(France / 2006)
CCS Bard presents this screening at Upstate Films free of charge and open to the public.  Reserve tickets at the box office.
As part of a retrospective of the work of Philippe Parreno, CCS Bard will bring a 35mm print of ZIDANE: A 21st CENTURY PORTRAIT.  Co-directed by Douglas Gordon and Parreno, who used 17 cameras to follow one soccer player, Zinedine Zidane, through the course of one game. Indie-band Mogwai provides the score for the film.
Parreno and Gordon worked with cinematographer Darius Khondji (DELICATESSEN, SEVEN), to capture one game in the life of the international soccer legend.  The cameras remain tightly zoomed on their subject, allowing the viewer to examine in stunning detail the physical and psychological mechanics involved in playing the game. In addition to the film’s sumptuous imagery, the lush sound design lets you hear everything from the force of the crowds roar to the breath of the football star.  In the words of Parreno, the film intends to show it’s audience what is happening to a famous footballer, “when TV is not watching”.
Unrated / 90 mins.
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The Secret of Kells

The Secret of Kells
May 24 – 27
Mon 8:15
Tues 8:15
Wed 5:50
Thurs 5:50 – Last Show
(France/Belgium/Ireland / 2009 / dir by Tomm Moore & Nora Twomey)
This hand-drawn, Oscar-nominated film, stylistically based on the famous Irish illuminated manuscript Book of Kells, stands proudly alongside today’s plethora of high-budget 3D features and shows that 2D animation still rocks.
Young Brendan lives in a remote medieval outpost under siege from barbarian raids. He is visited by a master illuminator who carries with him an uncompleted masterpiece brimming with secret wisdom and power. To help complete the magical book, Brendan must overcome his deepest fears and embark on a dangerous quest that takes him into the enchanted forest where mythical creatures hide.
Unrated / 75 mins.
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Babies

Babies
May 10 – 13
Mon 6:10 8:10
Tues 6:10 8:10
Wed 6:10 8:10
Thurs 6:10 8:10

May 14 – 20
Fri 5:10 7:10 9:00
Sat 3:10 5:10 7:10 9:00
Sun 4:10 6:10 8:10
Mon 5:30 8:00
Tues 6:00 8:00
Wed 6:00 8:00
Thurs 6:00 8:00

(France / 2010 / dir by Thomas Balmès)
From Mongolia to Namibia to San Francisco to Tokyo, this stunning film joyfully captures the earliest stages of life that are at once unique and universal to us all.
From birth to first steps, Balmès’s documentary beautifully conveys the differences and similarities between four children growing up in different cultures. Ponijao plays with rocks in her hut, Hattie dances in a baby swing in her apartment, Mari is carried through neon-lit city streets, and Bayar freely explores the animals and plants around him on his family farm. BABIES encourages viewers to reflect upon and revel in the intricacies of culture and the wonders of human life. In French with subtitles.
PG / 79 mins.
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