2019 Oscar Nominated Shorts – Documentary

For the 14th consecutive year, Shorts HD and Magnolia Pictures present the Oscar-Nominated Short Films. This is your annual chance to predict the winners (and have the edge in your Oscar pool)! A hit with audiences around the country, don’t miss this year’s selection of Documentary Shorts. Click below for information on the program. (Estimated Running Time: 137 mins)
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2019 Oscar Nominated Shorts – Live Action

For the 14th consecutive year, Shorts HD and Magnolia Pictures present the Oscar-Nominated Short Films. This is your annual chance to predict the winners (and have the edge in your Oscar pool)! A hit with audiences around the country, don’t miss this year’s selection of Live Action Shorts. Click below for information on the program. (Estimated Running Time: 108 mins)
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2019 Oscar Nominated Shorts – Live Action

For the 14th consecutive year, Shorts HD and Magnolia Pictures present the Oscar-Nominated Short Films. This is your annual chance to predict the winners (and have the edge in your Oscar pool)! A hit with audiences around the country, don’t miss this year’s selection of Live Action Shorts. Click below for information on the program. (Estimated Running Time: 108 mins)
Read More

2019 Oscar Nominated Shorts – Documentary

For the 14th consecutive year, Shorts HD and Magnolia Pictures present the Oscar-Nominated Short Films. This is your annual chance to predict the winners (and have the edge in your Oscar pool)! A hit with audiences around the country, don’t miss this year’s selection of Documentary Shorts. Click below for information on the program. (Estimated Running Time: 137 mins)
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Lion

*Nominated for 6 Academy Awards – Best Picture, Supporting Actor, Supporting Actress, Adapted Screenplay, Cinematography, Original Score.
*Golden Globe nominee – Best Motion Picture Drama, Original Score, Supporting Actor, Supporting Actress
From the production team that brought us The King’s Speech comes Lion, the inspirational true story of Saroo Brierley — who found himself lost at a train station in Calcutta at 5 years old, and who spent 25 years trying to find his way back home.

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Truth

Academy Award winner Cate Blanchett stars as CBS producer Mary Mapes, who climbs a slippery slope when she and Dan Rather (Robert Redford) organize a segment for 60 Minutes that has the potential to end George W. Bush’s presidency.
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The Babadook

babad
In Woodstock
Jan 24
Sat 8:00
(Australia / 2014 / dir by Jennifer Kent)
Unrated / 94 mins
Talk about debut first features… here’s one – about a young widow and her six year old son – that is a frightening on all levels – and that will stick with you and bodes well for Jennifer Kent’s filmmaking future.
Having lost her husband the day her son was born, forlorn young widow Amelia (Essie Davis) is at a loss to love and to deal with her six year old son Sam (Noah Wiseman) whose dreams are plagued by a monster he believes is coming to kill them both. When a disturbing storybook called ‘The Babadook’ turns up at their house, Samuel is convinced that the Babadook is the creature of his dreams. As his fears and his behavior spiral out of control, Amelia, genuinely frightened, is forced to medicate him. But when Amelia begins to see glimpses of a sinister presence all around her, it slowly dawns on her that the thing Samuel has been warning her about may be real. And soon she too is sucked into the Babadook’s world. A nail-biter.

“Let a law be passed, requiring all horror films to be made by female directors. It would curb so many antiquated tropes: the use of young women, say, underdressed or not dressed at all, who are barely fleshed out as characters before that flesh is coveted, wounded, or worse. Beyond that, the law would restore horror to its rightful place as a chamber of secrets, ripe for emotional inquisition. Such thoughts are prompted by “The Babadook,” a fine new Australian film, written and directed by Jennifer Kent. This is about a woman in peril, yet it has no truck with the notion that she is a mere victim. At times, indeed, the peril seems to be, if not her fault, at least of her own making. Is she the sum of all fears, or the root of them?” – Anthony Lane, The New Yorker

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The Babadook

babad
In Rhinebeck
Jan 19
Mon 8:35
(Australia/2014/dir by Jennifer Kent)
unrated / 94 mins
Talk about debut first features… here’s one – about a young widow and her six year old son – that is a frightening on all levels – and that will stick with you and bodes well for Jennifer Kent’s filmmaking future.
Having lost her husband the day her son was born, forlorn young widow Amelia (Essie Davis) is at a loss to love and to deal with her six year old son Sam (Noah Wiseman) whose dreams are plagued by a monster he believes is coming to kill them both. When a disturbing storybook called ‘The Babadook’ turns up at their house, Samuel is convinced that the Babadook is the creature of his dreams. As his fears and his behavior spiral out of control, Amelia, genuinely frightened, is forced to medicate him. But when Amelia begins to see glimpses of a sinister presence all around her, it slowly dawns on her that the thing Samuel has been warning her about may be real. And soon she too is sucked into the Babadook’s world. A nail-biter. 

“Let a law be passed, requiring all horror films to be made by female directors. It would curb so many antiquated tropes: the use of young women, say, underdressed or not dressed at all, who are barely fleshed out as characters before that flesh is coveted, wounded, or worse. Beyond that, the law would restore horror to its rightful place as a chamber of secrets, ripe for emotional inquisition. Such thoughts are prompted by “The Babadook,” a fine new Australian film, written and directed by Jennifer Kent. This is about a woman in peril, yet it has no truck with the notion that she is a mere victim. At times, indeed, the peril seems to be, if not her fault, at least of her own making. Is she the sum of all fears, or the root of them?” – Anthony Lane, The New Yorker

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The Railway Man

Coming Soon
(Australia, UK / 2014 / Directed by Jonathan Teplitzky)
Unrated / 116 mins.
A quiet railway and radio enthusiast meets his future wife on a Scottish train in 1983.
After a whirlwind courtship Eric Lomax (Colin Firth) and Patti (Nicole Kidman) marry, only to see their union undermined by his paralyzing nightmares. When she finally learns about his being tortured by the Japanese while he was a POW building the Thailand/Burma railway, Patti knows he must learn to forgive those who had done him harm. Based on a best-selling memoir that proves Gandhi’s aphorism, “Forgiveness is the attribute of the strong.”
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The Sapphires

Coming Soon
Check back for showtimes
(Australia / 2012 / Directed by Wayne Blair)
PG-13 / 106 mins.
Inspired by a true story, THE SAPPHIRES follows four vivacious, young and talented Australian Aboriginal girls from a remote mission as they learn about love, friendship and war when their all-girl group The Sapphires entertains the U.S. troops in Vietnam in 1968.
Cynthia (Tapsell), Gail (Mailman), Julie (Mauboy) and Kay (Sebbens) are discovered by Dave (O’Dowd), a good-humored talent scout with a kind heart, very little rhythm but a great knowledge of soul music. As their manager, Dave books the sisters their first true gig giving them their first taste of stardom, and travels them to Vietnam to sing for the American troops. – TWC
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Yogawoman

Coming Soon
Check back for showtimes
(Australia / 2011 / Directed by Saraswati Clere and Kate McIntyre Clere)
Unrated / 84 mins.
Through rich personal stories, Yogawoman uncovers a quiet revolution brewing across the globe as thousands of over-scheduled, over-stimulated, multitasking women discover strength and vitality through yoga.
Though brought to the west from India by a lineage of male teachers, today western women are transforming yoga in record numbers. Led by a new generation of dynamic female instructors, women today are embracing the practice for easing health conditions like breast cancer, infertility, anxiety, and eating disorders. From prisons to hospitals to living rooms, they are developing a “new” practice centered on intuition, flow, community, and activism. Through intimate interviews with experts like Patricia Walden, Sharon Gannon, Shiva Rea, Angela Farmer, and Sara Gottfried, Yogawoman distills the wisdom of this new generation of luminaries, sharing their message of peace and empowerment.
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Mao’s Last Dancer

Mao's Last DancerSeptember 7 – 9

Tues CLOSED
Wed 5:50 8:15
Thur 5:50 8:15 – Last Show


(Australia / 2009 / dir by Bruce Beresford)


A crowd-pleasing triumph from director Bruce Beresford (DRIVING MISS DAISY, TENDER MERCIES, BLACK ROBE, BREAKER MORANT), this is the true story of Li Cunxin, who leaves behind a life of poverty in provincial China to become an international ballet star.
Based on his best-selling autobiography, the story begins in the early 1970’s, when the 11-year-old Li is plucked from his small town and sent to a grueling government-run ballet academy in Beijing. As a young adult, Li catches the eye of Ben Stevenson (Bruce Greenwood), the director of the Houston Ballet, and is whisked away to the US on a three month exchange program. Once in Texas, Li blossoms as a performer, but he feels his homeland, as well as the Chinese authorities, beckoning him. Cast includes Kyle MacLachlan and Joan Chen. In English and Mandarin with subtitles.
PG / 113 mins.
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Bright Star

Bright Star
October 16 – 22
Fri 4:15
Sat 4:15
Sun 3:15
Mon 8:15
Tues 8:15
Wed 6:00
Thurs 6:00
Ends Thursday 10/22
(Australia / 2009 / wr. & dir. by Jane Campion)
Academy Award winner Jane Campion, the only woman to win the prestigious Cannes Film Festival’s Palme d’Or (THE PIANO), has a new film that’s based on the early nineteenth century romance between the young British poet John Keats and the girl next door.
In 1818, Keats (Ben Whishaw) was a mere 23 when he fell for Fanny Brawne (Abbie Cornish), an outspoken student of fashion. Keats was so touched by her efforts to help care for his ill younger brother that he agreed to teach her poetry. By the time Fanny’s alarmed mother and Keats’s best friend Mr. Brown realized their attachment, the relationship had an unstoppable momentum. Intensely and helplessly absorbed in each other, the young lovers were swept away with powerful new sensations: “I have the feeling as if I were dissolving”, Keats wrote to her.
R. / 119 mins.
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