The Princess Bride

Read the book, then watch the movie! Sunday July 30th at 1pm, Upstate Films and Oblong Books co-present this screening, followed by a book discussion.
Adapted by William Goldman from his novel of the same name, it’s not difficult to see why The Princess Bride has become a classic in the years since its 1987 release. Heroic fantasies, we often feel, should be lighter than air, hot as dragon fire, and fast as a sword in the sunlight. And that’s what we get from this epic delight — along with an ample supply of humor and foolery.
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1984

This winter, George Orwell’s 1984 once again made the best sellers list, 68 years after its initial publication. On April 9th, Upstate will partner with Oblong Books to present the film followed by a book group discussion. The screening will also include a recorded introduction and post-screening discussion with director Michael Radford. 
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The Haunting

Have you ever wanted to discuss the differences between a book and its movie rendition? Here’s your chance! Upstate Films and Oblong Books are partnering to bring you ADAPTATIONS — a series of combined book groups and screenings of select adapted works.
To kick off the series this Halloween, and to celebrate Shirley Jackson’s centennial, Oblong is organizing a book group around her 1959 novel The Haunting of Hill House. And Upstate will host a screening & discussion of its equally mesmerizing 1963 film adaptation on October 30th at 2pm in Rhinebeck. The screening is open to all. But if you’d like to join the book group, simply read the book, or check out Shirley Jackson’s new biography, click here.
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Love and Friendship – with director Whit Stillman

In Person: Writer-director Whit Stillman (Metropolitan, Last Days of Disco, Barcelona, Damsels in Distress). Friday June 22nd at 5:45 in Rhinebeck. This show will be followed by a q&a. Tickets on sale now at the Rhinebeck box office.
Stillman brings a unique sense and sensibility to his adaptation of an unpublished Jane Austen novel that stars Kate Beckinsale as a sassy social climber in the 1790s who’s blissfully unaware of her own self-absorption, and who doesn’t let the truth get in the way of a good story, after all “facts are horrid things”.
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